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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1959270, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1959270
Research Article

Substance P Receptor Signaling Mediates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Chemoresistance

1Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control, and Employee Health, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Department of Natural Science and Mathematics, Lee University, Cleveland, TN 37311, USA
3Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 20 November 2015; Accepted 11 January 2016

Academic Editor: Tomas Palecek

Copyright © 2016 Prema Robinson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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