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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 4521807, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4521807
Review Article

Animal Models of Uveal Melanoma: Methods, Applicability, and Limitations

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Bonn, Ernst-Abbe-Straße 2, 53127 Bonn, Germany

Received 29 February 2016; Accepted 8 May 2016

Academic Editor: Monica Fedele

Copyright © 2016 Marta M. Stei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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