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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6138424, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6138424
Review Article

White Matter Injury and Recovery after Hypertensive Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yujie Chen; moc.liamxof@6886nehceijuy

Received 9 February 2017; Accepted 7 May 2017; Published 7 June 2017

Academic Editor: Gang Chen

Copyright © 2017 Shilun Zuo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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