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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6423021, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6423021
Review Article

Bioinformatics Genes and Pathway Analysis for Chronic Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

1Department of Neurobiology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, China
2Cadet Brigade, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ping Yang

Received 7 April 2017; Revised 9 August 2017; Accepted 7 September 2017; Published 15 October 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Donato

Copyright © 2017 Guan Zhang and Ping Yang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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