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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 4258387, 29 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4258387
Review Article

Modelling Cooperative Tumorigenesis in Drosophila

1Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe Institute of Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
2Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Neurobiology, Cajal Institute (CSIC), Avenida Doctor Arce, No. 37, 28002 Madrid, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Helena E. Richardson; ua.ude.ebortal@nosdrahcir.h

Received 24 November 2017; Accepted 21 January 2018; Published 6 March 2018

Academic Editor: Daniela Grifoni

Copyright © 2018 Helena E. Richardson and Marta Portela. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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