BioMed Research International

Free-Living Animals as a Source of Bacterial and Fungal Zoonotic Pathogens


Publishing date
01 Apr 2020
Status
Closed
Submission deadline
29 Nov 2019

1University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Olsztyn, Poland

2University of Life Sciences, Lublin, Poland

3University of Life Sciences, Lublin, Poland

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Free-Living Animals as a Source of Bacterial and Fungal Zoonotic Pathogens

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Description

The popularity of game meat from free-living animals is on the rise due to its nutritional value, low fat content, and the fact that it does not originate from intensive animal farms; however, it should be remembered that free-living animals could act as environmental reservoirs of pathogens that are dangerous for humans. Therefore, the presence of pathogens in game meat should be researched for public health protection, particularly in the context of foodborne zoonotic diseases. A recent report from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) found that the major bacterial agents responsible for foodborne zoonoses include Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Yersinia spp., Listeria spp., and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. The transmission of these pathogens occurs by the alimentary route, and undercooked game meat may be a potential source of infection in humans. This is particularly significant in the context of wild ruminants whose meat can be consumed raw (e.g., Tatar rissole) or nearly raw (rare or medium-done steak). Evisceration of hunted animals without an appropriate hygiene protocol can also expose hunters to pathogens and lead to environmental contamination.

The special issue aims to bring together the latest research findings on free-living animals as a source of bacterial and fungal zoonotic pathogens. Researchers are invited to submit both original research and review papers on big game animals (wild boar, deer, etc.) as well as wild birds hunted for meat, excluding endangered species. Studies on bacterial and fungal contamination of cold-stored carcasses of game animals are also welcome. Research into foodborne zoonotic agents is encouraged, as are submissions covering new epidemiological studies, descriptions of new reservoirs of disease, and game meat safety. The aim of the special issue is not only to disseminate fundamental knowledge on bacterial and fungal zoonotic pathogens, but also to contribute to improvements in food safety and public health.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • The presence of bacterial and fungal zoonotic pathogens in free-living animals hunted for meat
  • Epidemiological studies of free-living animals as sources of bacterial and fungal zoonotic pathogens
  • Identification of new reservoirs of bacterial and fungal zoonotic pathogens in free-living animals
  • Microbial incidence and emerging bacterial and fungal zoonotic pathogens in game meat
  • New technologies and methods for detecting bacterial and fungal zoonotic pathogens in free-living animals
BioMed Research International
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