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Child Development Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 613674, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/613674
Research Article

Changes in Children's Answers to Open Questions about the Earth and Gravity

1Institute of Psychology, University of Tartu, Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu, Estonia
2Faculty of Education, University of Tartu, Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu, Estonia
3Institute of Psychology, Tallinn University, Narva mnt 25, 10120 Tallinn, Estonia

Received 29 December 2011; Accepted 10 April 2012

Academic Editor: Cheryl Dissanayake

Copyright © 2012 Triin Hannust and Eve Kikas. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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