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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2009, Article ID 608740, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/608740
Review Article

Impaired Perinatal Growth and Longevity: A Life History Perspective

Liggins Institute, National Research Centre for Growth and Development, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand

Received 22 May 2009; Accepted 1 July 2009

Academic Editor: Arnold Mitnitski

Copyright © 2009 Deborah M. Sloboda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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