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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 615709, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/615709
Research Article

Voxel Scale Complex Networks of Functional Connectivity in the Rat Brain: Neurochemical State Dependence of Global and Local Topological Properties

1Neurosciences Centre of Excellence in Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline Medicines Research Centre, via Fleming 4, 37135 Verona, Italy
2Translational Medicine, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN 46285, USA
3Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @NEST, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa, Italy
4Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche e Dipartimento di Fisica, Università “Sapienza”, Piazzale A. Moro 2, 00185 Rome, Italy
5Linkalab, Complex Systems Computational Laboratory, 09129 Cagliari, Italy

Received 27 March 2012; Revised 21 May 2012; Accepted 25 May 2012

Academic Editor: Fabrizio De Vico Fallani

Copyright © 2012 Adam J. Schwarz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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