Case Reports in Otolaryngology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision134 days
Acceptance to publication26 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-

Transoral Laser-Assisted Total Laryngectomy: Expanding the TLM’s World

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Case Reports in Otolaryngology publishes case reports and case series in all areas of otolaryngology, including head and neck surgery, facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, maxillofacial surgery, and pediatric otolaryngology.

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Case Report

Doxycycline Sclerotherapy of a Cervical Cystic Hygroma: A Caribbean Institution Experience

Cervical cystic lymphangiomas are rare benign tumors that pose a formidable challenge to surgeons confronted with managing this uncommon entity. Due to the intimacy with which these cystic lesions blend with critical cervical structures, a considerable number of patients who undergo surgical management are often plagued with recurrence and morbidity. As a result, doxycycline sclerotherapy has become an attractive, safe, and effective alternative as a primary treatment modality in a select group of pediatric patients. This case report presents an 18-month-old patient with a large cervical cystic hygroma that was effectively treated with exclusive doxycycline sclerotherapy.

Case Report

Contrast-Induced Sialadenitis of the Sublingual Glands

Contrast-induced sialadenitis (CIS) is a rare, delayed pseudoallergic reaction from iodine containing contrast. Previously reported cases of CIS demonstrated that the two major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) can be affected. The initial encounter of this entity can raise alarms to physicians as the differential diagnoses include serious infectious and inflammatory conditions such as Ludwig’s angina and angioedema. Subsequently, it may lead to unnecessary testing and increased healthcare cost. Here we present a 60-year-old male who presented with bilateral sublingual gland swelling following exposure to iodinated contrast. With timely diagnosis by the otolaryngologist, the patient received conservative management that led to a full resolution within a few days. To date, this is the first case of CIS only involving the sublingual glands. We conclude that CIS can involve any of the major salivary glands.

Case Report

Collision Tumor in the Pituitary, Concurrent Pituitary Adenoma, and Craniopharyngioma

Collision tumors are two independent, distinct tumors occupying the same anatomical space. This case presents a pituitary adenoma-craniopharyngioma collision tumor presenting with hemianopsia. A 60-year-old with a past history of a nonsecretory pituitary adenoma presented with progressive headaches, bitemporal hemianopsia, and nausea. Previously, in 2008, his adenoma was effectively treated with nasal septal flap and transsphenoidal pituitary resection. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was ordered for concern of recurrence, given his history and neurologic complaints. The MRI revealed a suprasellar mass extending into the third ventricle with displacement of the hypothalamus and optic chiasm. Laboratory testing revealed no indicators of endocrinopathy. The neurosurgical and otolaryngologic teams were elected to perform tumor resection given the ongoing symptoms. An image-guided transsphenoidal tumor resection with abdominal fat graft harvest and septal mucosal flap CSF leak repair was performed. Histopathological examination revealed two tumor components within the resection including an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma and recurrent pituitary adenoma.

Case Report

Acquired Hemophilia A Presenting as Massive Postoperative Bleeding in a Patient with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an extremely rare and serious bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Approximately, 10% of patients with AHA have an underlying malignancy. We report on a 46-year-old man with AHA and advanced oral cancer who presented with massive bleeding after surgery. Preoperative blood coagulation tests showed no abnormalities. He underwent radical tumor resection followed by reconstruction using a free rectus abdominal musculocutaneous flap. Massive subcutaneous hemorrhage developed in his neck and abdomen on the first postoperative day. The hemorrhage remained uncontrolled, despite embolization of the responsible vessels. Subsequent laboratory data showed prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and decreased FVIII levels. On the basis of his clinical course and the presence of the FVIII inhibitor, we speculated that the patient suffered from AHA. We administered recombinant activated factor VII and prednisolone, after which the spontaneous bleeding stopped and the subcutaneous hemorrhage resolved. A review of the literature identified only three previous documented cases of AHA associated with head and neck cancer. This case indicates that AHA should not be ruled out in patients with uncontrolled postoperative bleeding, while attempting to ensure bleeding control and preventing potentially catastrophic fatal consequences.

Case Report

Outcome and Complications of Frontal Sinus Stenting: A Case Presentation and Literature Review

Introduction. Frontal sinus surgery remains challenging to manage because of its complex anatomy and narrow outflow tract. A number of studies suggest the success of frontal sinus stenting to reduce postoperative complications in endoscopic frontal sinus surgery. However, failure and complications of frontal sinus stenting may occur. Method. We present a case of frontal sinus stenting with migration of the stent and erosion of the lamina papyracea together with a granulomatous reaction around the stent. PubMed and Medline search was also conducted to study the current evidence on frontal sinus stenting benefits and complications. Results. Still there are no guidelines or universally accepted indications for the use of frontal sinus stenting in the literature. A limited number of studies suggest the success of frontal sinus stenting to reduce postoperative stenosis in endoscopic frontal sinus surgery. However, failure and complications of frontal sinus stenting may occur. Infection, pain, edema, and stent obstruction may also occur. Our case report also highlights the potential of orbital complications as well as the consequences of inducing a granulomatous reaction. Conclusion. The value of frontal sinus stenting is still a subject of debate. Complications of frontal sinus stenting are not uncommon and thus necessitate regular follow-up.

Case Report

Middle Ear Salivary Choristoma: A Rare Case Report and Update on Congenital Associations, Facial Nerve Involvement, and Treatment Strategies

Salivary gland choristoma is an extremely rare middle ear mass and is hypothesized to be caused by second branchial arch developmental anomalies. We present a 14-year-old girl with Dandy–Walker syndrome and conductive hearing loss. Middle ear exploration revealed a large middle ear mass with absent incus and stapes and displaced facial nerve. The mass was completely excised with histological confirmation of salivary gland choristoma. Her hearing was improved with bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA). As facial nerve involvement is common, physicians should consider partial excision to avoid facial nerve palsy. Hearing restoration can be achieved with OCR or BAHA.

Case Reports in Otolaryngology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate37%
Submission to final decision134 days
Acceptance to publication26 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
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