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Cardiology Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 148796, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/148796
Review Article

Targeted In Situ Gene Correction of Dysfunctional APOE Alleles to Produce Atheroprotective Plasma ApoE3 Protein

Division of Medicine, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF, UK

Received 3 August 2011; Accepted 30 January 2012

Academic Editor: Sidney G. Shaw

Copyright © 2012 Ioannis Papaioannou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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