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Cardiology Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 213785, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/213785
Review Article

Potential of Novel EPO Derivatives in Limb Ischemia

1Vascular Unit, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, Royal Free Hospital, University College London (Royal Free Campus), Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK
2Centre for Rheumatology, University College London (Royal Free Campus), Pond Street, London NW3 2QG, UK

Received 15 July 2011; Accepted 12 December 2011

Academic Editor: Sidney G. Shaw

Copyright © 2012 Dhiraj Joshi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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