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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 140486, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/140486
Case Report

Dermoscopy of Rippled Pattern Sebaceoma

1Departments of Dermatology, Tokyo Woman's Medical University Medical Center East, 2-1-10 Nishi-Ogu, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo 116-8567, Japan
2Tachikawa-Sougo Hospital, Tokyo Woman's Medical University Medical Center East, 2-1-10 Nishi-Ogu, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo 116-8567, Japan
3Departments of Diagnostic Pathology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan
4Tachikawa-Sougo Hospital, Tokyo Medical University, Japan

Received 26 March 2010; Revised 1 June 2010; Accepted 25 June 2010

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Argenziano

Copyright © 2010 Mizuho Nomura et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A 77-year-old Japanese woman presented a dome-shaped pinkish nodule on the scalp. Dermoscopy demonstrated yellowish homogeneous ovoid areas with translucent whitish veil and arborizing vessels. No association with Muir-Torre syndrome was found. Histopathology revealed a smooth-bordered neoplasm in the dermis with partial connection to the epidermis. The tumor was composed mainly of germinative cells. The tumor focally showed a typical “rippled pattern”. There were only a few vacuolated cells suggesting sebaceous differentiation. These cells were highlighted with adipophilin antibody. No nuclear atypia or mitotic figures were observed. We regarded the neoplasm as sebaceoma. Dermoscopy demonstrated clearly visualized yellowish homogeneous ovoid areas. This feature usually corresponds to dermal conglomerations of the cells with sebaceous differentiation. However, this case histopathologically showed only limited area with sebaceous differentiation. We presented a case of rippled-pattern sebaceoma and described its dermoscopic features. This was the first report referring to the dermoscopic features of sebaceoma.