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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 847273, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/847273
Research Article

Understanding Patient Values and the Manifestations in Clinical Research with Traditional Chinese Medicine—With Practical Suggestions for Trial Design and Implementation

1Center for Evidence-Based Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 312 Anshanxi Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300193, China
2Tianjin Institute for Clinical Evaluation, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 88 Yuquan Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300193, China

Received 27 September 2013; Accepted 11 November 2013

Academic Editor: Boli Zhang

Copyright © 2013 Wei Mu and Hongcai Shang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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