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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 140247, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/140247
Research Article

Topical Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Oil from Tropidurus hispidus (Spix, 1825)

1Laboratory of Zoology, Regional University of Cariri (URCA), Pimenta, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil
2Program of Post-Graduation in Pharmacology, Federal University of Santa Maria, Campus Camobi, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
3Laboratory of Natural Products Research, Regional University of Cariri (URCA), Pimenta, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil
4Department of Biology, Paraiba State University (UEPB), 58429-500 João Pessoa, PB, Brazil
5Programa de Pós Graduação em Etnobiologia e Conservação da Natureza, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Rua Dom Manoel de Medeiros s/n, Dois Irmãos, 52171-900 Recife, PE, Brazil
6Universidade de Fortaleza, Avenida Washington Soares 1321, 60811-905 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
7Laboratory of Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry, Regional University of Cariri (URCA), Pimenta, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil
8Laboratory of Carcinology, Regional University of Cariri (URCA), Pimenta, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil
9Department of Nursing, Regional University of Cariri, 63105-000 Crato, CE, Brazil

Received 23 July 2015; Revised 23 September 2015; Accepted 28 October 2015

Academic Editor: Bamidele Owoyele

Copyright © 2015 Israel J. M. Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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