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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 204367, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/204367
Research Article

MicroRNA Profiling Response to Acupuncture Therapy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

1Department of Human Anatomy, College of Fundamental Medical Sciences, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, China
2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MDC 30, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
3Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, College of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, China
4Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center & Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou 550004, China

Received 19 May 2014; Revised 11 July 2014; Accepted 12 July 2014

Academic Editor: William C. Cho

Copyright © 2015 Jia-You Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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