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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7178105, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7178105
Research Article

Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activities of Salvia fruticosa: An HPLC Determination of Phenolic Contents

1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beirut Arab University, Beirut 115020, Lebanon
2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beirut Arab University, Beirut 115020, Lebanon
3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Damanhour University, Damanhour 22514, Egypt

Received 19 September 2015; Revised 22 November 2015; Accepted 30 November 2015

Academic Editor: Roi Treister

Copyright © 2016 Rima Boukhary et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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