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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 5934254, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5934254
Research Article

Fuzheng Quxie Decoction Ameliorates Learning and Memory Impairment in SAMP8 Mice by Decreasing Tau Hyperphosphorylation

1Xiyuan Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100091, China
2Graduate School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
3Datong Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanxi 037004, China
4Heze Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shandong 274002, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Jiangang Liu; moc.anis@2002gnagnaijuil and Hao Li; moc.621@5691oahilphyx

Received 9 July 2017; Accepted 11 October 2017; Published 20 December 2017

Academic Editor: Gunhyuk Park

Copyright © 2017 Yang Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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