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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 4360356, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4360356
Research Article

Hypoglycaemic and Antioxidant Effects of Propolis of Chihuahua in a Model of Experimental Diabetes

1Lab. Inmunobiología (L-321), UNAM FES Iztacala, Avenida de los Barrios Número 1, Colonia Los Reyes Iztacala, 54090 Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico
2IPN, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Av. Wilfrido Massieu, Gustavo A Madero, 07738 Ciudad de México, Mexico
3Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Coyoacán, DF, Mexico
4UBIMED, UNAM FES Iztacala, Avenida de los Barrios Número 1, Colonia Los Reyes Iztacala, 54090 Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico
5Lab. Farmacognosia, UBIPRO, UNAM FES Iztacala, Carrera Biología, Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to M. A. Rodriguez-Monroy; moc.liamg@yornomzeugirdorocram.rd

Received 8 August 2017; Revised 21 December 2017; Accepted 7 February 2018; Published 11 March 2018

Academic Editor: Eman Al-Sayed

Copyright © 2018 Nelly Rivera-Yañez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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