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Education Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 1726719, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/1726719
Research Article

Using Video Modeling to Teach a Meal Preparation Task to Individuals with a Moderate Intellectual Disability

Saint Vincent College, Latrobe, PA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Philip M. Kanfush; ude.tnecnivts@hsufnak.pilihp

Received 21 August 2018; Accepted 10 February 2019; Published 3 March 2019

Academic Editor: Gwo-Jen Hwang

Copyright © 2019 Philip M. Kanfush and Jordan W. Jaffe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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