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Education Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 4021729, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/4021729
Research Article

Medical Students’ Experience of Mindfulness Training in the UK: Well-Being, Coping Reserve, and Professional Development

1Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC), Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Canynge Hall 39 Whatley Road, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK
2Pennine GP Training Scheme, West Yorkshire, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Alice Malpass; ku.ca.lotsirb@ssaplam.a

Received 2 August 2018; Revised 17 October 2018; Accepted 3 January 2019; Published 3 February 2019

Academic Editor: Leonidas Kyriakides

Copyright © 2019 Alice Malpass et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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