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International Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Volume 2017, Article ID 2871579, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2871579
Research Article

Phenolics in Primula veris L. and P. elatior (L.) Hill Raw Materials

Laboratory of New Herbal Products, Department of Vegetable and Medicinal Plants, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW, Nowoursynowska 166, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Katarzyna Bączek; lp.wggs@kezcab_anyzratak

Received 3 March 2017; Revised 7 June 2017; Accepted 27 June 2017; Published 1 August 2017

Academic Editor: Ravi Ramasamy

Copyright © 2017 Katarzyna Bączek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Primula veris L. and Primula elatior (L.) Hill represent medicinal plants used for the production of herbal teas and preparations with antioxidant and expectorant activity. Flowers and roots of both species possess the same biological activity. In the presented study, raw materials of wild growing P. veris and P. elatior were compared in terms of the content and composition of phenolic compounds using a fast and simple HPLC-DAD method. The study showed that flowers of both species were rich in flavonoids. However, P. veris flowers were characterized with a distinctly higher content of isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside, astragalin, and (+)-catechin, whereas P. elatior occurred to be a richer source of rutoside and isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside. Hyperoside was found exclusively in P. elatior flowers. Phenolic glycosides (primverin and primulaverin) were identified only in the roots. Their content was about ten times higher in P. veris in comparison with P. elatior underground organs. The obtained results clearly show that both Primula species differ distinctly in terms of the content and composition of phenolic compounds. The compounds differentiating both species to the highest degree (hyperoside, in flowers, as well as primverin and primulaverin, in the roots) may be useful chemical markers in the identification and evaluation of both species.