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International Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Volume 2017, Article ID 5125329, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5125329
Research Article

Rapid Separation of Indole Glucosinolates in Roots of Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa Subsp. Pekinensis) by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detection

1Centre for the Research and Technology for Agro-Environment and Biological Sciences (CITAB), Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
2Agronomy Department, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal

Correspondence should be addressed to Alfredo Aires; tp.datu@aoderfla

Received 26 April 2017; Accepted 16 May 2017; Published 13 June 2017

Academic Editor: Mohamed Abdel-Rehim

Copyright © 2017 Alfredo Aires and Rosa Carvalho. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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