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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2010, Article ID 528474, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/528474
Review Article

Neuronal Models for Studying Tau Pathology

1Centro de Biología Molecular “Severo Ochoa” (C.S.I.C.-U.A.M.), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
2CIBERNED, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, 28031 Madrid, Spain
3Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain

Received 10 May 2010; Accepted 17 June 2010

Academic Editor: Gemma Casadesus

Copyright © 2010 Thorsten Koechling et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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