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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2010, Article ID 573138, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/573138
Review Article

Modeling of Tau-Mediated Synaptic and Neuronal Degeneration in Alzheimer's Disease

1Experimental Genetics Group, Department of Human Genetics, KULeuven-Campus Gasthuisberg ON1-06.602, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2Center of Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CMPB), Department of Neurology, University Medicine Göttingen, Waldweg 33, 37073 Göttingen, Germany

Received 18 May 2010; Accepted 9 July 2010

Academic Editor: Gemma Casadesus

Copyright © 2010 Tomasz Jaworski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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