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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 925050, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/925050
Review Article

Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

Neurobiology Laboratory for Brain Aging and Mental Health, Psychiatric University Clinics, University of Basel, Wilhelm Klein-Straße 27, 4012 Basel, Switzerland

Received 22 November 2010; Accepted 22 December 2010

Academic Editor: Katsuhiko Yanagisawa

Copyright © 2011 Lucia Pagani and Anne Eckert. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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