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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2011, Article ID 971021, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/971021
Review Article

The Role of Zinc in Alzheimer's Disease

Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Clarendon Way, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK

Received 14 September 2010; Accepted 9 November 2010

Academic Editor: Anthony R. White

Copyright © 2011 Nicole T. Watt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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