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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 684283, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/684283
Review Article

Alternative Strategy for Alzheimer’s Disease: Stress Response Triggers

Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA

Received 30 November 2011; Accepted 22 February 2012

Academic Editor: Agneta Nordberg

Copyright © 2012 Joan Smith Sonneborn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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