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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 734956, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/734956
Review Article

The Complexity of Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis: The Role of RAGE as Therapeutic Target to Promote Neuroprotection by Inhibiting Neurovascular Dysfunction

1Laboratoire des Neurobiologie des Interactions Cellulaires et Neurophysiopathologie (NICN), CNRS, UMR6184, Boulevard Pierre Dramard, 13344 Marseille, France
2Department of Medicine 1, University Hospital of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Received 2 November 2011; Accepted 2 December 2011

Academic Editor: Kiminobu Sugaya

Copyright © 2012 Lorena Perrone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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