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International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 518780, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/518780
Review Article

Cholesterol and Copper Affect Learning and Memory in the Rabbit

1Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
2Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 9302, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA

Received 27 June 2013; Accepted 31 July 2013

Academic Editor: Rosanna Squitti

Copyright © 2013 Bernard G. Schreurs. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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