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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 723419, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/723419
Review Article

Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

1Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Department of GI Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 19 August 2011; Accepted 8 October 2011

Academic Editor: Eok-Soo Oh

Copyright © 2012 David G. Menter and Raymond N. DuBois. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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