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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 736905, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/736905
Review Article

Aggrephagy: Selective Disposal of Protein Aggregates by Macroautophagy

Molecular Cancer Research Group, Institute of Medical Biology, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway

Received 1 December 2011; Accepted 6 January 2012

Academic Editor: Masaaki Komatsu

Copyright © 2012 Trond Lamark and Terje Johansen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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