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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2013, Article ID 674751, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/674751
Review Article

ER Dysfunction and Protein Folding Stress in ALS

1Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago, Chile
2Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
3Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Program of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
4Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA

Received 22 May 2013; Accepted 2 September 2013

Academic Editor: Roberto Chiesa

Copyright © 2013 Soledad Matus et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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