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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2013, Article ID 797914, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/797914
Review Article

The Role of S-Nitrosylation and S-Glutathionylation of Protein Disulphide Isomerase in Protein Misfolding and Neurodegeneration

1Department of Neuroscience in the School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia
2Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia

Received 21 June 2013; Revised 19 August 2013; Accepted 2 September 2013

Academic Editor: Christian Appenzeller-Herzog

Copyright © 2013 M. Halloran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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