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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2015, Article ID 368584, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/368584
Review Article

Hyaluronan Synthesis, Catabolism, and Signaling in Neurodegenerative Diseases

1Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, OR 97006, USA
2Department of Cell, Developmental & Cancer Biology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA
3Department of Integrative Biosciences, School of Dentistry, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA
4Department of Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA

Received 3 February 2015; Accepted 11 April 2015

Academic Editor: Wiljan J. A. J. Hendriks

Copyright © 2015 Larry S. Sherman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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