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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2017, Article ID 6169310, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6169310
Research Article

Class-Specific Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Promote 11-Beta Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Expression in JEG-3 Cells

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
2APC Microbiome Institute, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
3INFANT Centre, Cork University Maternity Hospital, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
4Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland

Correspondence should be addressed to Gerard W. O’Keeffe; ei.ccu@effeeko.g

Received 28 October 2016; Revised 17 January 2017; Accepted 24 January 2017; Published 21 February 2017

Academic Editor: Wiljan J. A. J. Hendriks

Copyright © 2017 Katie L. Togher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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