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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 585876, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/585876
Review Article

Increasing Whole Grain Intake as Part of Prevention and Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

1Nestlé Research Center, Vers chez les Blanc, 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland
2Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden
3Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

Received 22 January 2013; Accepted 3 April 2013

Academic Editor: Marion Cornu

Copyright © 2013 Alastair B. Ross et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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