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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 245459, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/245459
Research Article

The Effect of Long-Term Intranasal Serotonin Treatment on Metabolic Parameters and Hormonal Signaling in Rats with High-Fat Diet/Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetes

1Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Thorez Avenue 44, Saint Petersburg 194223, Russia
2Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, Leningradskaya Street 68, Pesochny, Saint Petersburg 197758, Russia

Received 11 December 2014; Revised 27 April 2015; Accepted 30 April 2015

Academic Editor: Ichiro Sakata

Copyright © 2015 Kira V. Derkach et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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