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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 949085, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/949085
Review Article

Regulation of Estrogen Receptor α Expression in the Hypothalamus by Sex Steroids: Implication in the Regulation of Energy Homeostasis

Department of Biology, Miami University, 700 E. High Street, Oxford, OH 45056, USA

Received 19 May 2015; Revised 18 July 2015; Accepted 22 July 2015

Academic Editor: Mario Maggi

Copyright © 2015 Xian Liu and Haifei Shi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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