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International Journal of Food Science
Volume 2015, Article ID 545640, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/545640
Review Article

Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods

1Laboratório de Sensores Biológicos, Escola de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida Horácio Macedo 2030, CT, Bloco E, Sala E-122, Ilha do Fundão, 21941-598 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Laboratório de Bioquímica Nutricional e de Alimentos, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida Athos da Silveira Ramos 149, CT, Bloco A, Sala 528A, Ilha Fundão, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
3Laboratório de Microbiologia de Alimentos, Escola de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida Horácio Macedo 2030, CT, Bloco E, Sala E-104, Ilha do Fundão, 21941-598 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 18 August 2014; Revised 13 January 2015; Accepted 21 January 2015

Academic Editor: Jessica L. Jones

Copyright © 2015 Vânia Paula Salviano dos Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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