International Journal of Food Science
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate22%
Submission to final decision80 days
Acceptance to publication67 days
CiteScore2.360
Impact Factor-
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Progressive Freeze Concentration of Coconut Water and Use of Partial Ice Melting Method for Yield Improvement

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Food Science publishes research in all areas of food science. It is a multidisciplinary journal and includes research on enhancing shelf life, food deterioration, food engineering, food handling, food processing and similar.

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International Journal of Food Science maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Determinants of Microbial Contamination of Street-Vended Chicken Products Sold in Nairobi County, Kenya

Food safety problems pose a great threat to the health of consumers with the greatest burden in developing countries. Street-vended foods play a key role in providing many urban dwellers with cheap, nutritious, and accessible food, but when prepared in an unhygienic and unregulated environment, they could contribute to increased food safety burden. The study investigated the microbiological recovery of work surfaces and chicken sold in Korogocho and Kariobangi North slums in Nairobi County as well as evaluating vendors’ hygiene and food safety practices. This is a cross-sectional study on an exhaustive sample size of 15 vendors, and swabs of the equipment and work surfaces and chicken were taken for microbial analysis. An exhaustive sample size of 15 vendors was selected for the study. The results showed that most vendors operate under unhygienic conditions. Microbial results revealed that raw portions of chicken had the highest contamination with all the four tested microorganisms (). The level of E. coli ranged from to ; Salmonella spp., to ; Staphylococcus aureus, to ; and Campylobacter jejuni, to log CFU/g in raw and cooked chicken samples, respectively. The predictors of E. coli contamination were the presence of pests and flies, unclean vending place, vending environment littered with waste, washing of hands by the vendor, and lack of appropriate clothing among the vendors at of 0.33. The vendor practices and environmental hygiene of the vending place would not significantly () predict contamination with Campylobacter and Staphylococcus. Consequently, there is a need to regulate the informal food processing and marketing channels, besides trainings, infrastructural development, and code of practice and inspections which are recommended in order to enhance the quality and safety standards of street-vended chicken products.

Research Article

Effect of Size and Drying Time on the Rehydration and Sensory Properties of Freeze-Dried Snails (Achatina achatina)

Snails, a delicacy in most tropical communities, are highly perishable and seasonal. Employed preservative methods are highly temperature dependent, adversely affecting their nutritional value and sensory properties. This study was aimed at determining the effect of size and drying time on the rehydration and sensory properties of freeze-dried snails. Snails were sized into three categories with average weights: 7.59 g (quarter-sized), 14.41 g (half-sized), and 30.71 g (whole), and freeze-dried for 15, 20, and 25 h. The moisture content and percent rehydration of the dried samples were determined by standard methods and sensory properties assessed by an in-house panel of 30 using a 5-point hedonic scale. The moisture content of the fresh and freeze-dried samples ranged from 65.80 to 75.20% and 3.25 to 10.24%, respectively. Freeze-dried samples had higher percent rehydration (27 to 102%) than the control; smoked snails (21 to 32%). Size had a significant () effect on the rehydration ability of the samples with the half-sized and freeze-dried for 15 h samples having the highest. The freeze-dried samples generally had higher consumer preference than the control in all attributes assessed. The findings show that freeze-drying snails (approximate weight of 14.4 g) for 15 h could be a consumer-preferred alternative preservative method for extending the shelf life of snails.

Research Article

Effect of Steam Blanching, Dehydration Temperature & Time, on the Sensory and Nutritional Properties of a Herbal Tea Developed from Moringa oleifera Leaves

The core purpose of the current study is to explore the use of Moringa oleifera leaves, to produce a herbal tea with acceptable sensory properties and nutritional properties by utilizing the steam blanching technique, different dehydration temperatures and time, which can be accepted in the Sri Lankan market. Six sets of samples were prepared where temperature and time combinations were 55°C—6 h, 60°C—4.30 h, 65°C—3 h for the unblanched samples & 55°C—6 h, 60°C—5.30 h & 65°C—4 h for the steam blanched samples. These samples were evaluated, employing a trained panel of 5 tea tasters and a semi trained panel of 35 members. The sample code 706 (steam blanched, 65°C—4 h) was selected as the sample with best sensory attributes. The blanched and unblanched samples dried at 65°C were tested for their proximate, mineral, vitamin, antioxidant and phytochemical contents. The effects of steam blanching on these two samples were evaluated & compared. This study highlights that steam blanching significantly increased the carbohydrates, fat, Mn, Fe, vitamin A, vitamin E and the DPPH scavenging activity whereas steam blanching significantly reduced the protein, fiber, Na, K, Ca, Total phenolic contents and flavonoids content but vitamin C, Zn, Cu and Mg contents were unaffected by steam blanching.

Research Article

Physicochemical, Rheological, and Morphological Characteristics of Products from Traditional and Extrusion Nixtamalization Processes and Their Relation to Starch

The aim of this study was to compare the physicochemical, rheological, and morphological characteristics of corn, nixtamalized flour, masa, and tortillas from the traditional nixtamalization process (TNP) and the extrusion nixtamalization process (ENP) and their relationship with starch. The traditional and extrusion processes were carried out using the same variety of corn. From both processes, samples of ground corn, nixtamalized flour, masa, and tortillas were obtained. The extrusion process produced corn flour with particle sizes smaller (particle size index, PSI = 51) than that of flour produced by the traditional nixtamalization process (PSI = 44). Masa from the TNP showed higher modulus of elasticity () and viscosity () values than that off masa from the ENP. Furthermore, in a temperature sweep test, masa from the TNP showed a peak in and , while the masa from the ENP did not display these peaks. The ENP-produced tortillas had higher resistant starch contents and comparable firmness and rollability to those from the TNP but lower quality parameter values. A comparison of the products’ physicochemical properties obtained by the two processes shows the importance of controlling the damage to starch during the milling and extrusion processes to obtain tortillas of better quality. For the first time, we propose the measurement of the viscoelastic parameters and in temperature sweep mode to monitor changes in the degree of starch damage.

Research Article

Chemical and Antioxidant Charaterization of Native Corn Germplasm from Two Regions of Costa Rica: A Conservation Approach

The cultivation of native corn has decreased in favor of the cultivation of improved commercial corn varieties. This study seeks to evaluate the antioxidant and antibacterial potential of 36 samples of native corn germplasm from the Brunca (BR) and Chorotega (CR) regions of Costa Rica. The main parameters of comparison were the composition of antioxidant compounds, antiradical activity, and microbicidal effect. The total amount of polyphenols in the germplasm (120 mg GAE/100 g d.w.) was not related to the regions from which the samples were obtained. The overall average for antioxidant capacity was 21.20 μmol TE/g d.w. Accessions from the CR region had higher antioxidant capacity. Anthocyanin content was higher in purple accessions and undetectable in white germplasm. Antioxidant capacity was statistically related to polyphenols content (, ). The most promising corn accessions in terms of nutraceutical value came from the CR region.

Research Article

Phytochemicals in Leaves and Roots of Selected Kenyan Orange Fleshed Sweet Potato (OFSP) Varieties

This study reports the inherent phytochemical contents in leaves and roots of nine sweet potato varieties from Kenya. Results indicated that vitamin C content varied significantly () among the sweet potato varieties regardless of the plant part, leaves having significantly () higher levels than in the roots. Total flavonoids and phenolic compounds differed significantly () among varieties, higher values were found in leaves than in roots. Flavonoid contents in roots ranged from below detectable limits (Whitesp) to 25.8 mg CE/100 g (SPK031), while in leaves it ranged from 4097 to 7316 mg CE/100 g in SPK4 and Kenspot 5, respectively. Phenolic content was below detectable limits in the roots of whitesp but it was in substantial amounts in orange fleshed varieties. The β-carotene content was significantly () higher in leaves (16.43–34.47 mg/100 g dry weight) than in roots (not detected—11.1 mg/100 g dry weight). Total and phytic phosphorus were directly correlated with phytate contents in leaves and the roots. Tannins and soluble oxalates varied significantly () with variety and plant part being higher in leaves. The current information is important for ration formulations and dietary recommendations utilizing sweet potato leaves and roots. Future studies on effects of processing methods on these phytochemicals are recommended.

International Journal of Food Science
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate22%
Submission to final decision80 days
Acceptance to publication67 days
CiteScore2.360
Impact Factor-
 Submit