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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012, Article ID 284786, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/284786
Research Article

Predictive Models of Gene Regulation from High-Throughput Epigenomics Data

1Computational Genomics, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Dr. Aiguader 88, Barcelona, Spain
2Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys 23, Barcelona, Spain

Received 3 February 2012; Accepted 2 May 2012

Academic Editor: Sonia Vanina Forcales

Copyright © 2012 Sonja Althammer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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