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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2095195, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2095195
Research Article

Gene Expression Analysis of Alfalfa Seedlings Response to Acid-Aluminum

1School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
2Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
3Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai 201101, China

Received 27 July 2016; Accepted 12 October 2016

Academic Editor: Wenwei Xiong

Copyright © 2016 Peng Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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