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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2016, Article ID 3460416, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3460416
Review Article

Overview on the Role of Advance Genomics in Conservation Biology of Endangered Species

1The Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, China
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
3Center for Human Genome Research, Cardio-X Institute, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
4National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, College of Plant Sciences and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
5Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar 25000, Pakistan

Received 21 July 2016; Revised 23 October 2016; Accepted 8 November 2016

Academic Editor: Hieu Xuan Cao

Copyright © 2016 Suliman Khan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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