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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5214806, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5214806
Research Article

The miRNA Pull Out Assay as a Method to Validate the miR-28-5p Targets Identified in Other Tumor Contexts in Prostate Cancer

1Non-coding RNA Laboratory, Institute of Clinical Physiology (IFC), CNR, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, Italy
2Tuscan Tumor Institute (ITT), Via Alderotti 26/N, 50139 Firenze, Italy
3Instute of Life Science, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Piazza Martiri delle Libertà 33, 56127 Pisa, Italy
4Laboratory of Integrative Systems Medicine (LISM), Institute of Informatics and Telematics (IIT) and Institute of Clinical Physiology (IFC), CNR, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, Italy
5Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3b, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Milena Rizzo; ti.rnc.cfi@ozzir.anelim

Received 30 May 2017; Accepted 1 August 2017; Published 20 September 2017

Academic Editor: Davide Barbagallo

Copyright © 2017 Milena Rizzo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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