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International Journal of Genomics
Volume 2018, Article ID 8576890, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8576890
Review Article

Shiftwork-Mediated Disruptions of Circadian Rhythms and Sleep Homeostasis Cause Serious Health Problems

1The Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, China
2Collaborative Innovation Center of Water and Security for Water Source Region of Mid-Line of South-to-North Diversion Project, College of Agricultural Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang, Henan, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Lunguang Yao; moc.361@oaygnaugnul and Hongwei Hou; nc.ca.bhi@whuoh

Received 19 September 2017; Accepted 12 December 2017; Published 21 January 2018

Academic Editor: Zhining Wen

Copyright © 2018 Suliman Khan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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