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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 295916, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/295916
Research Article

Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

1Department of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
2Department of Public Health Sciences, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL 60153, USA

Received 30 July 2014; Revised 27 September 2014; Accepted 27 September 2014; Published 19 October 2014

Academic Editor: Amgad N. Makaryus

Copyright © 2014 Abiodun M. Adeoye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH), isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH), and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH). Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5%) and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7%) were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2%) was higher among males . Female subjects were more obese and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations.