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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2010, Article ID 910283, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/910283
Review Article

Antimicrobial Peptides in Gastrointestinal Inflammation

Department of Internal Medicine I, Robert Bosch Hospital, Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Auerbachstr. 112, 70376 Stuttgart, Germany

Received 28 July 2010; Accepted 18 August 2010

Academic Editor: G. Rogler

Copyright © 2010 Simon Jäger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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