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International Journal of Nephrology
Volume 2012, Article ID 937623, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/937623
Review Article

An Overview of Molecular Mechanism of Nephrotic Syndrome

1Pathology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-180 Uberaba, MG, Brazil
2Immunology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-180 Uberaba, MG, Brazil
3Technical Health School of UFPB, Federal University of Paraíba, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PA, Brazil

Received 8 May 2012; Revised 20 June 2012; Accepted 20 June 2012

Academic Editor: Omran Bakoush

Copyright © 2012 Juliana Reis Machado et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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