International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing
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Submission to final decision103 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore0.630
Impact Factor-
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SIFO: Secure Computational Infrastructure Using FPGA Overlays

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing aims to serve the large community of researchers and professional engineers working on the theoretical and practical aspects of reconfigurable computing.

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International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Review Article

From FPGA to Support Cloud to Cloud of FPGA: State of the Art

Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) draws a significant attention from both industry and academia by accelerating computationally expensive applications and achieving low power consumption. FPGAs are interesting due to the flexibility and reconfigurabiltiy of their device. Cloud computing becomes a major trend towards infrastructure and computing resources dematerialization. It provides “unlimited” storage capacities and a large number of data and applications that make collaboration easier between multiple (not domain specific) designers. Many papers in the literature have surveyed Cloud and FPGA separately and, more precisely, their services and challenges. The acceleration of applications by FPGA and the unlimited capacities of the cloud are expected to be more and more pervasive. As more and more FPGA are being deployed in traditional cloud, it is appropriate to clarify what is the cloud FPGA and which drawbacks of using FPGA in local are resolved. We present a survey of the cloud FPGA works that have been proposed to exploit the advantages of using FPGA in the cloud. We classify these studies in three services to highlight their benefits and limitations. This survey aims at motivating further researches in cloud FPGA.

Research Article

Automatic Pipelining and Vectorization of Scientific Code for FPGAs

There is a large body of legacy scientific code in use today that could benefit from execution on accelerator devices like GPUs and FPGAs. Manual translation of such legacy code into device-specific parallel code requires significant manual effort and is a major obstacle to wider FPGA adoption. We are developing an automated optimizing compiler TyTra to overcome this obstacle. The TyTra flow aims to compile legacy Fortran code automatically for FPGA-based acceleration, while applying suitable optimizations. We present the flow with a focus on two key optimizations, automatic pipelining and vectorization. Our compiler frontend extracts patterns from legacy Fortran code that can be pipelined and vectorized. The backend first creates fine and coarse-grained pipelines and then automatically vectorizes both the memory access and the datapath based on a cost model, generating an OpenCL-HDL hybrid working solution for FPGA targets on the Amazon cloud. Our results show up to 4.2× performance improvement over baseline OpenCL code.

Research Article

ViPar: High-Level Design Space Exploration for Parallel Video Processing Architectures

Embedded video applications are now involved in sophisticated transportation systems like autonomous vehicles and driver assistance systems. As silicon capacity increases, the design productivity gap grows up for the current available design tools. Hence, high-level synthesis (HLS) tools emerged in order to reduce that gap by shifting the design efforts to higher abstraction levels. In this paper, we present ViPar as a tool for exploring different video processing architectures at higher design level. First, we proposed a parametrizable parallel architectural model dedicated for video applications. Second, targeting this architectural model, we developed ViPar tool with two main features: (1) An empirical model was introduced to estimate the power consumption based on hardware utilization and operating frequency. In addition to that, we derived the equations for estimating the hardware utilization and execution time for each design point during the space exploration process. (2) By defining the main characteristics of the parallel video architecture like parallelism level, the number of input/output ports, the pixel distribution pattern, and so on, ViPar tool can automatically generate the dedicated architecture for hardware implementation. In the experimental validation, we used ViPar tool to generate automatically an efficient hardware implementation for a Multiwindow Sum of Absolute Difference stereo matching algorithm on Xilinx Zynq ZC706 board. We succeeded to increase the design productivity by converging rapidly to the appropriate designs that fit with our system constraints in terms of power consumption, hardware utilization, and frame execution time.

Research Article

Dimension Reduction Using Quantum Wavelet Transform on a High-Performance Reconfigurable Computer

The high resolution of multidimensional space-time measurements and enormity of data readout counts in applications such as particle tracking in high-energy physics (HEP) is becoming nowadays a major challenge. In this work, we propose combining dimension reduction techniques with quantum information processing for application in domains that generate large volumes of data such as HEP. More specifically, we propose using quantum wavelet transform (QWT) to reduce the dimensionality of high spatial resolution data. The quantum wavelet transform takes advantage of the principles of quantum mechanics to achieve reductions in computation time while processing exponentially larger amount of information. We develop simpler and optimized emulation architectures than what has been previously reported, to perform quantum wavelet transform on high-resolution data. We also implement the inverse quantum wavelet transform (IQWT) to accurately reconstruct the data without any losses. The algorithms are prototyped on an FPGA-based quantum emulator that supports double-precision floating-point computations. Experimental work has been performed using high-resolution image data on a state-of-the-art multinode high-performance reconfigurable computer. The experimental results show that the proposed concepts represent a feasible approach to reducing dimensionality of high spatial resolution data generated by applications such as particle tracking in high-energy physics.

Research Article

Translating Timing into an Architecture: The Synergy of COTSon and HLS (Domain Expertise—Designing a Computer Architecture via HLS)

Translating a system requirement into a low-level representation (e.g., register transfer level or RTL) is the typical goal of the design of FPGA-based systems. However, the Design Space Exploration (DSE) needed to identify the final architecture may be time consuming, even when using high-level synthesis (HLS) tools. In this article, we illustrate our hybrid methodology, which uses a frontend for HLS so that the DSE is performed more rapidly by using a higher level abstraction, but without losing accuracy, thanks to the HP-Labs COTSon simulation infrastructure in combination with our DSE tools (MYDSE tools). In particular, this proposed methodology proved useful to achieve an appropriate design of a whole system in a shorter time than trying to design everything directly in HLS. Our motivating problem was to deploy a novel execution model called data-flow threads (DF-Threads) running on yet-to-be-designed hardware. For that goal, directly using the HLS was too premature in the design cycle. Therefore, a key point of our methodology consists in defining the first prototype in our simulation framework and gradually migrating the design into the Xilinx HLS after validating the key performance metrics of our novel system in the simulator. To explain this workflow, we first use a simple driving example consisting in the modelling of a two-way associative cache. Then, we explain how we generalized this methodology and describe the types of results that we were able to analyze in the AXIOM project, which helped us reduce the development time from months/weeks to days/hours.

Research Article

An FPGA-Based Hardware Accelerator for CNNs Using On-Chip Memories Only: Design and Benchmarking with Intel Movidius Neural Compute Stick

During the last years, convolutional neural networks have been used for different applications, thanks to their potentiality to carry out tasks by using a reduced number of parameters when compared with other deep learning approaches. However, power consumption and memory footprint constraints, typical of on the edge and portable applications, usually collide with accuracy and latency requirements. For such reasons, commercial hardware accelerators have become popular, thanks to their architecture designed for the inference of general convolutional neural network models. Nevertheless, field-programmable gate arrays represent an interesting perspective since they offer the possibility to implement a hardware architecture tailored to a specific convolutional neural network model, with promising results in terms of latency and power consumption. In this article, we propose a full on-chip field-programmable gate array hardware accelerator for a separable convolutional neural network, which was designed for a keyword spotting application. We started from the model implemented in a previous work for the Intel Movidius Neural Compute Stick. For our goals, we appropriately quantized such a model through a bit-true simulation, and we realized a dedicated architecture exclusively using on-chip memories. A benchmark comparing the results on different field-programmable gate array families by Xilinx and Intel with the implementation on the Neural Compute Stick was realized. The analysis shows that better inference time and energy per inference results can be obtained with comparable accuracy at expenses of a higher design effort and development time through the FPGA solution.

International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision103 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore0.630
Impact Factor-
 Submit